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20111201
20111231
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CSPAN2 18
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CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 12:00pm EST
the beginning. but more importantly, syria, where they are now both on the same side, working with the opposition to overthrow the al-assad regime. though not for the same reasons i don't think. in the case of turkey, i think it's more a personal betrayal of pious side of prime minister aired a gun and the promises he made to aired a gun and didn't the field. the saudi's position is really to eliminate uranian influence in syria and assorted kittie vaden for what happened in iraq, where the american invasion created a shiite dominated government tilting towards iran, from which was a major loss in the saudi constellation and thinking about the arab world. so coming here they are in the same i fighting to overthrow the hussein government. and man, in september, turkey decides that it is going to host a nato early warning antimissile system aimed mostly against uranian. ms publicly puts turkey on the saudi arab sunni side of the saudi iranian conflict. i think that's a major turning point in the whole relationship because that is where turkey commit itself militarily to be in on
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2011 9:00am EST
there and expand its influence in gaza. i think similar situation may emerge in syria which certainly will be a loss for the iranians if assad falls. i think their relationship with the regime is not just limited to assad. it's also in the security apparatus as well as the fact that even if it becomes a loss to iranians it doesn't automatically translate to a win for everyone else. it's most likely syria will turn into yet another one of the regions that will become a proxy for a major powers to fight each other rather than squarely falling into the capital deals. >> yes? >> henri, you mentioned the crisis that erupted between washington and over turkey's deal with iran on the nuclear issue, particularly the uranium enrichment deal they helped broker with brazil. it seems like when you look at the issue of turkey and the u.s., aside from the obama-erdogan chemistry, turkey stepping away from the iran issue. these being a very vocal advocate for iran. but you mentioned you see sort of things get harder for iran possibly then coming back to turkey. and i'm wondering, what are the condit
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2011 8:30am EST
to revise some of its basic precepts of its policy in the middle east, particularly with respect to syria, for example, where it's gone from a policy of close cooperation with the syrian government to a much more challenging stance. and here in washington the question of whether or not the turkish nod el is -- model is applicable to the arab states as some of them at least attempt political transitions has become much discussed. often discussed in rather superficial ways, i think, but fortunately, it's also possible to go into the subject in a much deeper and profound way. that's what's been done in this paper which you have before you from i said separation to aspiration. he is chairman of the center for economics and foreign policy studies in istanbul, and he's also a visiting scholar with carnegie based in brussels and also comes to washington regularly, so it's a pleasure to welcome him here today to talk about that. we also have two beginned commentators. -- distinguished commentators. vice president for carnegie. of course, deputy prime minister of jordan and foreign minister of jor
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2011 5:00pm EST
the operation in libya has restricts us strategically in relation to iran and the mideast, generally? syria? >> i'm not sure i understand the logic of the question. i think, frankly, position, our diplomatic position with iran is what we do or don't do in libya is unlikely to significantly affect it. i don't think that -- i don't think that it affects our position in syria at all. syria is a very different situation. foreign secretaries make it. >> do you think the russian-chinese vetoes on various resolutions. possibly relation by iran. >> i have to say, i think it's a question for the foreign secretary. that has not -- that is not -- that had not occurred to me as logic for the russian-chinese president in syria. >> anyway, i'll leave that with you. >> surely you would accept that -- somebody who spoke and voted in favor of the action that are blatant targeting one side or the other. the russians are chinese are saying once again, we are not going to allow nato to leave because we were given that freedom by the u.n. i don't care what they said, we took it. >> i think we took the side of t
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2011 5:00pm EST
and in particular syria. we've worked closely together to increase the pressure on the regime. we welcome the recent action by the arab league and i met with members of the opposition last week. we encourage other arab leaders to meet with them as well and continue our support for peaceful protests and reform inside syria and compared notes on the parliamentary elections in egypt. the egyptian people are justifiably proud to begin the process of choosing their new leaders. we urge the egyptian authorities to ensure that free and fair voting continues through the next election round and that there would be a steady transition toward a new civilian government. and at the same time we call upon the peaceful protesters and holding those accountable for previous incidents of violence. this is just a snapshot and for again foreign secretary, welcome back to washington. >> thank you very much. ladies and gentlemen is a great pleasure. our goal is to be here in washington with secretary clinton. the united states of america is closest and indispensable ally in the foreign policy, and as ever we've had a gre
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2011 5:00pm EST
, and also, we have over 4,000 syria descendents killed over the last eight months. what would you do to support those who want to overthrow the brutal regime? >> good questions. on iran, the only rational long term policy is regime replacement and we need a covert capability. i would focus on their gasoline supply, 40e% of the gas they use has to be imported, only one very, very large refinery, focused how to sabotage that every day. [applause] you know -- [applause] follow the reagan playbook. i would fund every group in the country. find the maximum amount of communications disability for the groups in the country, do everything i could to unnerve the regime and keep it off bans, and you would break it and replace it, and all of these studies, you know, it's amazing to me how little people study history. you know, the iaea says we're this close or not, but we were wrong about the pakistani nuclear weapons and wrong in the late 1940s. they got it used before we thought they would. why would you think we can relax? we know they have a program. we know there's sincerity. therefore, as
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2011 9:00am EST
that path. we continued that pattern, and i would argue in libya and here in syria. we establish diplomatic relationships with assigned, called him a reformer, and still have the embassy there. us last to the american public about what is at stake. what is at stake is evidently clear as we look at the situation developing in iran. iran is on the precipice of developing a nuclear weapon. it is a time when we need someone in the executive office, the oval office who has the courage of their convictions, who has the experience and who has the will to stand up and do what is right. to confront this radical theocracy that if they receive a nuclear weapon, if they develop one will fundamentally change not just the middle east, it will change the world. there is no greater purveyor of the world than iran. there is no greater threat to the existence of israel than iran. and we must stand up and say, not only that they shouldn't get a nuclear weapon. the president says that but it's another one of the picks in the ncaa bracket. it doesn't matter unless you have the power and the will to do something
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2011 9:00am EST
definable national security interests, scratch our heads over syria, and we lecture israel all the while, and i say during all of this, the center fusions continue to spin in iran. they are moving towards nuclear stay tut. i believe the mullas in teheran already made a decision for themselves that they want to be a nuclear power. they look at north korea and see they have a few crude devices, and they are essentially untouchable. they looked at libya, they gave up their program in exchange for international friendship and relationships. i think they concluded that they want the credibility, the leverage that a nuclear weapon gets them. the center fusions spin, and ultimately it goes from low enriched product to a high enriched product to make a weapon. they'll have enough material. the united states is going to have to be ready, i think, to con prompt the reality of what to do -- confront the reality of what to do, and in this case, you then have to say as the speaker mentioned, the question for us in the country is can we live with a nuclear iran. i think china decided they can live wit
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2011 5:00pm EST
's response, for example to what has been going on in syria and their steadfast refusal to condemn the shocking and appalling and disgusting brutality of the syria and regime in cracking down on pro-democracy protesters there, i don't see a hopeful outlook for the likely response of the kremlin and if putin. i hope i'm wrong. i want to be wrong. this is an instance where we all want to be wrong but i think it remains to be seen and i know we will have more opportunity to discuss this further as the dialogue begins. thank you. >> thank you very much. and now david, please. >> when i got the news about the election results and particularly about the demonstrations in moscow over the corrupt electoral process, i was reminded of two incidents, one in real life and one in literature. one, the one from real life was of course the moment when nikolai chichester addressing a huge crowd was suddenly looted and the booing escalated. he was taken completely off back newsreels of that incident, which took place in the late '80s showed him completely discomforted by the fact that his previously
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2011 9:00am EST
where something is happening in syria, journals are not allowed to get into syria. there's a military attack taking place in a small village and i can get on twitter and message to the 50,000 or people that follow and say can somebody give me a contact or eyewitnesses? and in seconds i will get people saying here's the number, his a contact them to somebody you can go. i will give that information, call that person and to the chosen part of it which is verified, report, and then use the very same technology to get that information to put it back out online and disseminated to the public. this has become a two-way street. at the same time i wasn't able to decimate the broader audience without the very same technolo technology. >> so you put out to tweet, what's the future of journalism. what was some of the things people said to you? >> i mean, the constant themes i got was not being told, media should not be beholden to the interests of the few that decide what gets to be the rundown, so to speak. it's all about your involvement in your engagement. people want to be able to understand
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2011 9:00am EST
and syria and a global network of sleeper operatives who could be called to launch an attack at any time. just last year in july of 2010, we saw the first ied explode south of the u.s. border in mexico since the fall of 2008, at least 111 suspects hezbollah linked of drug traffickers and money launders have been arrested of an international operation coordinated by dea and i could go on and talk about the owner of the cafe in tijuana arrested in 2002, another individual who traveled all the way to dearborn, michigan, spent four and a half years in prison for conspiring to raise money for hezbollah. there's just a lot of cases there and so, mr. benson, i would ask how much of a priority should hezbollah be to american and counterterrorism policy? >> congressman, as we look at the tide of the drug trafficking and terrorism we do see that around the globe. for the dea it's a priority that we look at those organizations and we look at their connection across the globe. >> in your activities with dea -- and thank you for serving our region of south carolina where i'm from, by the way. i meant
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2011 12:00pm EST
months, as the assad regime in syria has slaughtered roughly 4,000 of its own citizens who are seeking a democratic future, what has been the russian government's response? with the help of china russia has been absolutely shameless in blocking any serious action in the united nations security council including by vetoing a toothless security council resolution that would not imposed sanctions but hinted at the possibility of sanctions. at the same time while the assad regime's bloody rampage has continued against the syrianian people, the russian government has continued to serve as its primary supplier of weaponry. just last week in a story entitled "russia delivers missiles to syria" a.f.p. reported despite the brutal violence of the assad regime over israel's objections russia delivered 22 supersonic missiles to the syrian government worth at least $300 million. then there is russia's continued interference in the sovereign territory and internal affairs of the republic of georgia. a country that the russian military invaded in 2008 and continues to occupy to this day. two weeks ag
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2011 9:00am EST
disagreements with russia support of syria, hamas, and she came to russia moscow on all the issues of great importance to israel. so she clearly made a calculation that as she was negotiating with russia about matters of great importance to israel, that would be not the best time for him to criticize russian government domestic policy. during last 20 years, we came from a very different conclusion. we came to a conclusion that after the end of the cold war we can tell about everybody, how they should conduct domestic affairs, and that we can do it without an impact on the u.s. interests and on the u.s. ability to do things which are very important to us, like russian support of iran, like continuing supplies across russia to afghanistan. things that really affect american security and american lives. whether we should be able to have our cake and eat it too, it's difficult to make a prediction but i do believe that there are instances when american interests and american values are in some conflict and i also believe that doing what is in the u.s. national interest is that it saves american
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2011 12:00pm EST
dictator to die, and he sent it over, was a side in syria. lookup that is working for syria. >> guest: i think this is a good point because while there are many who say that she's going to be gotten in north korea, i mean, while you can make a direct comparison between what happened in the arab spring what happened in north korea, we did learn from the air springs of these sorts of regimes are quite brittle. you think succession is an easy thing to do just because dictators want to stay in power. it's just not that easy. >> host: from the new york times yesterday you said quote, while some observers hope that kim jong-il's death will unleash democratic regime change, china will work strongly against that possibility. you go on to write but given that beijing has the only eyes inside the north, washington and so could do little in response. can you elaborate? >> guest: one of the questions as we go forward is what will be china's role in trying to prop up the north. there's a pitcher right now in the region that has a greater stake in keeping the koreas divided in china. china has made it
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2011 12:00pm EST
weapons and expressed serious concerns about the military dimensions of iran's nuclear program. syria was so serious about developing a nuclear weapon, probably with the help of north korea and iran, that in 2007 israel had to destroy a syrian nuclear site. terrorist groups and other rogue actors also seek the development or the acquisition of nuclear arms. and, ofand of course fourth we t yet forget about russia. your honor the provisions of the new start agreement, russia can expand its nuclear force rather than pursue reductions. russia tends to build a heavy new icbm be available by 2018. russia expects to build eight new nuclear submarines, and it also plans on designing and building a new nuclear bomber. we cannot afford to let our nuclear deterrent atrophy in light of so many nuclear threats. once we lose nuclear capabilities, it will be extremely hard to reconstitute them. we need a reliable and credible nuclear arsenal. we need it to dissuade new nations from acquiring nuclear weapons. we need it to deter nuclear powers from using their weapons, and we need it to hold enemy a
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2011 12:00pm EST
they serve in are very dangerous. look at what ambassador robert ford has been doing in syria amid that country's upheaval. blocking qualified and talented americans from serving in posts in el salvador or any place in the world is not in america's best long-term interest. during a recent foreign relations committee markup, which you intended, relating to ambassador aponte's nomination, chairman kerry offered senator demint another opportunity to review all the materials that we have regarding ambassador aponte. i hope he took advantage of that offer. should he still oppose her nomination, i disagree with him, of course, but respect his rights in the senate. he can register his vote along with the other senators, but i certainly hope that this critical and important nomination will not be unfairly held up and discredited with another filibuster. mr. president, it's time for the senate to move beyond filibusters to work in an effort to try to solve our problems. mr. president, there was a recent survey of how many families in america have an immediate member of the family who is ser
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2011 12:00pm EST
that with the connection tehran has with today mass us in -- damascus and syria and hamas and hezbollah and you have a very lethal combination of elements playing out here. as for me, i say the leadership in iran has already decided to go nuclear. i think they have looked at the world. they looked at north korea. they're a nuclear power. maybe a handful of crude devices, they're out of reach for most people they look at libya which had a program they gave up for international friendships and alliances look what happened there. i think in tehran they're saying we want the leverage and stature that being a nuclear power will bring. so then we have to ask ourselves a simple question. can you live with a nuclear iran? if the answer is yes, then you're going to have to live with i think the dramatic proliferation implications including saudi arabia going nuclear, turkey likely going nuclear. egypt, although we don't know what the leadership structure is going to look like anytime soon but chances are with the strong backbone of egyptian military they go nuclear. i say at that point you have lost control of prol
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2011 12:00pm EST
. once into the other crisis they're looking at in yemen and the crisis there looking at in syria. what makes that so different? well, one of my concerns is that leaders of our two-thirds arab libyan and one-third african. libya is a member of the arab league and the african union. and african as mercenaries. they said they don't have a place there. so several thousand people in jail, most of them are african women who came out of hardship from sudan and manager and said in egypt and algeria. well, somebody has to say something. those inconvenient truth that honor our tradition. the tradition of change. i want to thank all of you today for the state, and i am anxious for us to continue the idea of the institute because it belongs to us. pass on a vaccine. i've seen a lot across the years. how could i have ever applied, camping in new hampshire. why? a part of my stop by rhythm. i did go. i did see that the hampshire, you would know that unless you went. how was it to back where should i be in the i/o is a privilege to campaign. i was told. to many white people. i found the pain is what
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18